A sperm consists of the head, tail and mid-piece sections. To successfully fertilise an egg, the sperm will need to be able to move its tail (motility) to propel itself through cervical mucus to travel through the uterus and fallopian tube to reach the egg. It will also need to be normally shaped in order to penetrate the outer shell of the egg to deliver its genetic package contained in the head.
Male Infertility is due to low sperm production, abnormal sperm function or blockages that prevent the delivery of sperm. Illness, injuries, chronic health problems, lifestyle choices and other factors can play a role in causing male infertility.

To know about the treatment for male infertility.

depression

Although most men with Male Infertility do not notice symptoms other than the inability to conceive a child, other signs and symptoms includes:

Pain, swelling or a lump in the testicle area

Recurrent respiratory infections

Abnormal breast growth (Gynecomastia)

Decreased facial or body hair or other signs of a chromosomal or hormonal abnormality

Problems with sexual function — for example, difficulty with ejaculation or small volumes of fluid ejaculated, reduced sexual desire, or difficulty maintaining an erection (erectile dysfunction)

A lower than normal sperm count (fewer than 15 million sperm per milliliter of semen or a total sperm count of less than 39 million per ejaculate)

To know about the treatment for male infertility.

Infection:

Some infections can interfere with sperm production or sperm health or can cause scarring that blocks the passage of sperm. These include inflammation of the epididymis (epididymitis) or testicles (orchitis) and some sexually transmitted infections, including gonorrhea or HIV. Although some infections can result in permanent testicular damage, most often sperm can still be retrieved.

infection
Male Infertility

Ejaculation issues:

Retrograde ejaculation occurs when semen enters the bladder during orgasm instead of emerging out the tip of the penis. Various health conditions can cause retrograde ejaculation, including diabetes, spinal injuries, medications, and surgery of the bladder, prostate or urethra. Some men with spinal cord injuries or certain diseases can’t ejaculate semen, even though they still produce sperm. Often in these cases sperm can still be retrieved for use in assisted reproductive techniques.

Male Infertility

Tumors:

Cancers and non-malignant tumors can affect the male reproductive organs directly, through the glands that release hormones related to reproduction, such as the pituitary gland, or through unknown causes. In some cases, surgery, radiation or chemotherapy to treat tumors can affect male fertility.

Male Infertility
Male Infertility

Undescended Testicles:

In some males, during fetal development one or both testicles fail to descend from the abdomen into the sac that normally contains the testicles (scrotum). Decreased fertility is more likely in men who have/had this condition.

Male Infertility

Hormone Imbalances:

Infertility can result from disorders of the testicles themselves or an abnormality affecting other hormonal systems including the hypothalamus, pituitary, thyroid and adrenal glands. Low testosterone (male hypogonadism) and other hormonal problems have a number of possible underlying causes.

Male Infertility
Male Infertility

Problems with sexual intercourse:

These can include trouble keeping or maintaining an erection sufficient for sex (erectile dysfunction), premature ejaculation, painful intercourse, anatomical abnormalities such as having a urethral opening beneath the penis (hypospadias), or psychological or relationship problems that interfere with sex.

Male Infertility

Certain medications:

Testosterone replacement therapy, long-term anabolic steroid use, cancer medications (chemotherapy), certain antifungal medications, some ulcer drugs and certain other medications can impair sperm production and decrease male fertility.

Male Infertility
Male Infertility alchol

Alcohol use:

Drinking alcohol can lower testosterone levels, cause erectile dysfunction and decrease sperm production. Liver disease caused by excessive drinking also may lead to fertility problems.

Male Infertility alchol

Tobacco smoking:

Men who smoke may have a lower sperm count than those who don’t smoke. Secondhand smoke also may affect male fertility.

Male Infertility
stress

Emotional stress:

Stress can interfere with certain hormones needed to produce sperm. Severe or prolonged emotional stress, including problems with fertility, can affect your sperm count.

stress

Depression:

Research shows that the likelihood of pregnancy may be lower if a male partner has severe depression. In addition, depression in men may cause sexual dysfunction due to reduced libido, erectile dysfunction, or delayed or inhibited ejaculation.

Men in depression
weight

Weight:

Obesity can impair fertility in several ways, including directly impacting sperm themselves as well as by causing hormone changes that reduce male fertility.

weight

To know about the treatment for male infertility.